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United We Fight: While Organizers Build Unity in Ferguson, Media Sows Discord

by John Reed
August 27, 2015

The frequency with which the police kill young Black men makes a couple of weeks seem like the distant past, and underscores the steep hill that the pushback against police violence and repression has to climb. For four days bridging the second weekend in August, Ferguson and the rest of the St. Louis metro area were the focus of that fightback. A coalition of 40 groups organized a series of events to remember Michael Brown and 1,000 other people killed by police in the United States in the past year, and to mark the one-year anniversary of the Ferguson uprising sparked by Brown’s killing.

Under the slogan “United We Fight,” organizers consciously and specifically sought to bring progressive whites and the LGBT community into alliance with the Black community to grow the movement to end police violence and repression in the face of what they saw as an “unresponsive body politic.” They adopted a festival approach to organizing: instead of any one group insisting that everyone had to get behind their event, any group could participate in whatever way they felt comfortable as long as they promoted the whole festival of events...

Moral Combat: Voting Rights and North Carolina's Moral Mondays

by Katie O'Reilly
August 6, 2015

By the time I’d registered as a driver's license-holding North Carolinian, the NC NAACP, along with likeminded civil rights groups, had made a Monday habit of storming their state capitol to demonstrate in plain view of their lawmakers. Beginning in April 2013 and enduring week after week, during rain, shine, and 100-plus-percent humidity,
A Moral Monday protest.
thousands of people, led by the Moses-esque Barber, were descending upon Raleigh to protest the onslaught of their state’s controversial new legislation—and in the process, hundreds of them were getting “peacefully arrested.” This cycle is known as “Moral Mondays,” and after arriving in North Carolina, I soon learned that among my neighbors, it had become a household term—not unlike the way “sit-ins” and “Freedom Rides” edged their way into everyday lexicon during the South’s “second Reconstruction.”

And when the General Assembly adjourned in 2013, the “Moral” activity did not end. In fact, it blossomed into a full-scale, statewide and remarkably unpartisan-in-name “Moral Movement”—marked by hundreds of hyperlocal rallies, as well as the coalition of groups both faith-based and not; African American and white; working-class and moneyed; queer and straight; along with Latinos, educators, laborers, and military veterans...

Connecting Sanders' Audience’s Aspirations to Clear Working Class Political Alternatives

by Traven and Joanna
July 29, 2015

Solidarity understands the strategic imperative of organizing a mass base for independent working class political action that unites working people, the independent social movements, and organizations of the oppressed in a battle for their common interests against capitalism and its political representatives. Unlike those on the left who continue to see the Democratic Party as a lesser evil that can be influenced from within, we regard the Democratic Party as unreformable, committed to imposing capital’s neoliberal project. History has shown all too many times that the Democratic Party remains the graveyard of social movements. We reject being drawn into the slippery slope of Democratic Party politics.

Nevertheless, any significant advance in independent working class politics requires a fracturing away of the Democratic Party’s mass base. As an austerity-first party, Democratic lesser-evilism has lost much of its allure. We strongly disagree with Bernie Sanders’ approach of running in the Democratic primary and his pledge to support the Party nominee. However, it would be a mistake for the left not to recognize the enormous significance and potential inherent in the millions of people rallying around his campaign...

Rainbows and Weddings: The Neoliberal and Imperialist Politics of LGBT Rights

by Mehlab Jameel
July 6, 2015

Just like the neoliberalization of LGBT rights, there is a specific history of how the LGBT movement was globalized. In her address to United Nations in December 2011 on the anniversary of Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Hillary Clinton came out in support of the “global LGBT community” in a speech that declared gay rights as human rights. The then Secretary of State declared it a "violation of human rights" to commit violence or discrimination against people because of their sexual orientation. In an impassioned defense of such rights, Clinton called the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people "universal" and criticized nations that criminalize gay behavior or tolerate abuse of LGBT people.

In order to understand why the U.S. is at the forefront of the Gay Rights movement in world politics we need to locate it in the history of U.S. imperialism. The relation between empire and sexuality is a complex one, and before we attempt to find answers by dissecting this intersection between power, race, gender, and sexuality, it is important to ask the right questions. Why is there a need to universalize LGBT rights? What assumptions underlie a universal framework of LGBT rights and how do these emerge? Why is there an attempt to situate LGBT rights as a modern institution against an oppressive tradition?

August 27, 2015
by John Reed
The frequency with which the police kill young Black men makes a couple of weeks seem like the distant past, and underscores the steep hill that the pushback against police violence and repression has...
August 6, 2015
by Katie O'Reilly
By the time I’d registered as a driver's license-holding North Carolinian, the NC NAACP, along with likeminded civil rights groups, had made a Monday habit of storming their state capitol to...
July 29, 2015
by Traven and Joanna
Solidarity understands the strategic imperative of organizing a mass base for independent working class political action that unites working people, the independent social movements, and organizations...
July 6, 2015
by Mehlab Jameel
Just like the neoliberalization of LGBT rights, there is a specific history of how the LGBT movement was globalized. In her address to United Nations in December 2011 on the anniversary of Universal...

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